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Revolutionary tech empowers immune system to hunt and crush cancer.

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A new technology using CRISPR has been developed to make cancer cells more visible to the immune system, potentially leading to new methods of cancer treatment. The technology, called TRED-I (Targeted Reactivation and Demethylation for MHC-I), increases the amount of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the surface of cancer cells. MHC class I molecules are necessary for the immune system to recognize and eliminate cancer. The TRED-I system has been tested in animal cancer models and has shown promising results in reducing tumor size and increasing the activity of CD8+ T cells, the immune system’s cancer-fighting cells. It has also shown potential in treating metastasized cancers. Further research will focus on delivering the TRED-I system directly to cancer patients.

A new technology using CRISPR has been developed to make cancer cells more visible to the immune system, potentially leading to new methods of cancer treatment. The technology, called TRED-I (Targeted Reactivation and Demethylation for MHC-I), increases the amount of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the surface of cancer cells. MHC class I molecules are necessary for the immune system to recognize and eliminate cancer.

The researchers, led by Professor Koichi Kobayashi of Hokkaido University and Dr. Paul de Figueiredo of the University of Missouri, discovered a gene called NLRC5 that regulates MHC class I levels. They found that NLRC5 is suppressed in cancer cells through a process called DNA methylation, which reduces levels of MHC class I. The TRED-I system restores DNA methylation of the NLRC5 gene and activates NLRC5, thus increasing MHC class I levels in cancer cells without causing severe side effects.

The TRED-I system was tested in animal cancer models and showed promising results. It significantly reduced tumor sizes and increased the activity of CD8+ T cells, the immune system’s primary cancer-fighting cells. When used in combination with existing immunotherapy, the TRED-I system enhanced treatment efficacy. It also showed potential in treating metastasized cancers.

The researchers believe that with further refinement, the TRED-I system could significantly contribute to cancer therapy. They plan to focus on enabling the direct delivery of the system to cancer patients, which could improve the efficacy of the immune system in eliminating cancer and enhance the response to existing therapy.

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